Inventing Genocide - The Contingent Origins of a Concept During World War II - Holocaust Living History Workshop
Date: 4/25/2019; 76 minutes


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The suite of international conventions and declarations about genocide, human rights, and refugees after the WWII is known as the "human rights revolution." It is regarded as humanizing international affairs by implementing the lessons of the Holocaust. In this presentation, Dirk Moses, Professor of Modern History at the University of Sydney, questions this rosy picture by investigating how persecuted peoples have invoked the Holocaust and made analogies with Jews to gain recognition as genocide victims. Such attempts rarely succeed and have been roundly condemned as cheapening the Holocaust memory, but how and why does genocide recognition require groups to draw such comparisons? Does the human rights revolution and image of the Holocaust as the paradigmatic genocide humanize postwar international affairs as commonly supposed? Recorded on 04/10/2019. (#34019)


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