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Everything we can see and touch is made up of chemical elements as illustrated on the Periodic Table of Elements. The heaviest, naturally occurring element is uranium. Using high-energy particle accelerators, scientists have created even heavier elements extending the Periodic Table of Elements up to element 118. Also find out more about element 116, Livermorium, named in in honor of the scientists and research that has been done at LLNL since its discovery. Recorded on 02/06/2016.

Collectively rare disorders are more prevalent than cancer and many other commonly known diseases. It might seem obvious that something that is rare should warrant little of our attention. But science does not move in a straight line. A case could be made that exploratory, basic research might result in as much or more progress than research targeted only to the most common diseases. These choices must be made in the context of multiple stakeholders including healthcare professionals, scientists, funders of research, regulators, and patients. Hudson Freeze, Professor of Glycobiology & Director of the Human Genetics Program at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute explains the pervasiveness of rare disorders and the kinds of research being done.

Why just read about ancient Rome when you can walk the cobbled streets as if you were really there? That's the promise of virtual reality, augmented reality and mixed reality in today's classrooms. While the idea of strapping on goggles to virtually visit the Colosseum or go inside a molecule sounds like the stuff of science fiction, the technology to do just that is becoming more popular and available every day. Yes, there are plenty of obstacles from cost to teacher training but using virtual reality as an educational tool offers considerable benefits. Not only can it boost visual and technology literacy, but it also improves students' attention and engagement. Learn how this technology has the possibility to transform K-12 education from educators and engineers gathered by UC San Diego. Recorded on 09/13/2017.

The Scripps Research Institute's Katja Lamia gives a brief perspective on the history of circadian clock research and introduces current ideas about how circadian disruption increases the risks of cancer and metabolic diseases. Recorded on 02/10/2018.

High energy, long life, rechargeable batteries are considered an important technological opportunity to reduce production of greenhouse gases. What standards should be set for safety of new energy storage technologies? And who should enforce those standards? Learn about these exciting developments as well as how best to meet potential social and ethical challenges from Ying Shirley Meng, Ph.D., Associate Professor Department of Nano Engineering University of California, San Diego.
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