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Scripps Oceanography's Octavio Aburto examines how Mangroves, trees that form forests in the transition between land and sea, provide an essential habitat for a great diversity of plants and animals and why it is vital to put enormous efforts into understanding the value of mangrove ecosystems. Recorded on 06/12/2017.

"Basic mechanisms in the brain have universal applications and are the road to medical discovery," says Ralph Greenspan, PhD. Learn more as he joins William Mobley MD, PhD to discuss how his work creating dynamic maps of brain activity is shedding light not only on brain function but how we diagnosis and treat neurological diseases. Dr. Greenspan discusses his work with the national BRAIN Initiative, Cal-BRAIN, and discoveries in his lab at UC San Diego.

Seven and a half billion humans are changing the way we relate to the oceans. In this fast-changing world, marine animals and plants must adapt fast to a warmer and corrosive environment as ocean acidification, pollution and deoxygenation continue. This global crisis is causing humans to be anxious about the safety of our oceans for recreation and as a source of food. Debora Iglesias-Rodriguez discusses how humans can contribute to ameliorate current ocean problems and eventually return the oceans to a more sustainable state. Recorded on 07/12/2017.

Patients are frequently given the wrong antibiotics to treat bacterial infections, but it is not the physician who is at fault. The standard antibiotic test used worldwide is flawed since it is based on how well drugs kill bacteria on petri plates not how well they kill bacteria in the body. Mike Mahan describes an "in vivo" antibiotic test that mimics conditions in the body. Drugs that pass the standard test often fail to treat bacterial infections, whereas drugs identified by the test are very effective. Recorded on 07/24/2017.

The Salk Institute's Rusty Gage and University of Washington's Evan Eichler explore the mechanisms and evolutionary pathways that have differentiated human neural development and allowed for the emergence of genes found only in humans. Recorded on 09/29/2017.
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