The Library Channel
The UC San Diego Library presents The Library Channel, featuring interviews, author talks, mini-documentaries and other programs that will inspire you to Read, Write, Think and Dream.
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Racism in German and American Cinema of the Twenties: From The Ancient Law to The Jazz Singer with Charles Musser - Holocaust Living History Workshop
11/11/2019
Yale University professor and filmmaker Charles Musser explores the historical and contemporary perspectives of race relations in German and American cinema from the 1920s by examining The Ancient Law (1923) and The Jazz Singer (1927). He evaluates how each film addresses anti-Semitism as well as the burning question of the history of blackface as a theatrical convention. Recorded on 10/24/2019.
Learning from the Germans: Race and the Memory of Evil with Susan Neiman - Holocaust Living History Workshop
10/19/2019
As an increasingly polarized America fights over the legacy of racism, Susan Neiman, author of the contemporary philosophical classic Evil in Modern Thought, asks what we can learn from the Germans about confronting the evils of the past. In the wake of white nationalist attacks, the ongoing debate over reparations, and the controversy surrounding Confederate monuments and the contested memories they evoke, Susan Neiman's Learning from the Germans delivers an urgently needed...
The Private Art of Theodor “Dr. Seuss” Geisel - Dinner in the Library 2019
10/1/2019
Theodor Geisel, a.k.a. Dr. Seuss, created paintings and sketches for his own enjoyment. Some of these pieces were on loan from the Geisel estate and exhibited at the UC San Diego Library for the 16th annual Dinner in the Library gala. Join a panel of distinguished speakers as they explore broad themes woven throughout Geisel's works and its literary and artistic impact. Panelists Mary Beebe, Stuart Collection, Seth Lerer, Professor of Literature, and Rob Sidner, Mingei...
Blade Runner 2019: Did Life Imitate Art?
5/28/2019
The film Blade Runner was set in a dystopian 2019 Los Angeles. A timely gathering is in order. Three futurists sit down for a conversation on the film's legacy and its relevance to Southern California. The guest speakers are David Brin, Paul Sammon and Mike Davis. They discuss the film's influence and compare its vision with today's 2019. Blade Runner initially underperformed in theaters when it was first released in 1982; some praised its thematic complexity and visuals, while...
When Biology Became Destiny: How Historians Interpret Gender in the Holocaust - Holocaust Living History Workshop
5/1/2019
Despite the explosive growth of Holocaust studies, scholars of Nazi Germany and the Shoah long neglected gender as an analytical category. It wasn't until 1984 when the essay collection When Biology Became Destiny: Women in Weimar and Nazi Germany raised awareness of women's experiences under fascism. It explored women's double jeopardy as females and as Jews. In this lecture, Marion Kaplan, one of the editors the publication, takes the audience on a historical tour of her...
Inventing Genocide - The Contingent Origins of a Concept During World War II - Holocaust Living History Workshop
4/25/2019
The suite of international conventions and declarations about genocide, human rights, and refugees after the WWII is known as the "human rights revolution." It is regarded as humanizing international affairs by implementing the lessons of the Holocaust. In this presentation, Dirk Moses, Professor of Modern History at the University of Sydney, questions this rosy picture by investigating how persecuted peoples have invoked the Holocaust and made analogies with Jews to...
The Perfect Predator: A Scientist's Race to Save Her Husband from a Deadly Superbug with Steffanie Strathdee and Thomas Patterson
3/13/2019
Delve into the realms of predatory superbugs with infectious disease epidemiologist Steffanie Strathdee and her husband, psychologist Thomas Patterson. This is an incredible story of Strathdee's fight to save her husband's life, which led her to rediscover a forgotten treatment for antibiotic-resistant bacteria. This unprecedented treatment saved Patterson's life as well as several others and helped launch the Center for Innovative Phage Applications and Therapeutics (IPATH) at...
Inventing Languages: A Conversation in Language Construction
2/25/2019
Constructed languages, or conlangs, are well-known in science fiction and fantasy literature as ways of creating an immersive world-building experience. Join us in learning how linguists design the sound systems and grammars to behind some of our favorite conlangs.  With Grant Goodall (Professor and Language Program Director, UC San Diego Linguistics), David J. Peterson (Creator of Dothraki, Game of Thrones), and Paul Frommer (Creator of Na'vi, Avatar). Moderated by Tamara...
Learning in the Age of Google - The Library Channel
10/30/2018
What does it means to be literate in the age of Google?  At a time when you can search billions of texts in milliseconds, scan over trillions of online images, and look deeply into planet-wide maps, we need to rethink what it means to be literate, and to be a learner. Dan Russell, the Űber Tech Lead for Search Quality and User Happiness at Google, reviews what literacy means today and shows how some very surprising and unexpected skills will turn out to be critical in...
An Evening with Luis Alberto Urrea - Dinner in the Library 2018
9/27/2018
San Diego-raised novelist and UC San Diego alumnus, Luis Alberto Urrea '77 is the featured speaker at the UC San Diego Library annual gala. Urrea, a 2005 Pulitzer Prize finalist, has written about the border and has knitted together stories in a way that makes them familiar and impactful for everyone. Recorded on 09/21/2018.
Against All Odds: Born in Mauthausen with Eva Clarke -- Holocaust Living History Workshop -- The Library Channel
7/2/2018
What does it mean to be born in a concentration camp, arguably one of the most inhospitable places on earth? Eva Clarke was one of three "miracle babies" who saw the light of day in KZ Mauthausen in Austria. Nine days after her birth, the Second World War ended. As a newborn, Eva's chances of survival were extremely slim; against all odds, she lived, making her and her mother Anka the only survivors of their extended family. In 1948, they emigrated from Prague to the UK...
Rising from the Rubble: Creating POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews with Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett
6/14/2018
Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett explores the creation of the POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews on the site of the former Warsaw Ghetto and its multimedia narrative exhibition honoring the lives of those who have passed. Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, a professor emerita at New York University, is also the chief curator of the Core Exhibition at the POLIN Museum. She is presented here by the Jewish Studies Program and the Library at UC San Diego. Recorded on 04/11/2018.
Celebrating Paper Theater
6/7/2018
UC San Diego's Geisel Library hosts an annual Paper Theater Festival, celebrating an art form with roots in Victorian Era Europe. Paper theaters (also known as toy theaters) were used to promote productions. They were printed on paperboard sheets and sold as kits at the concession stand of an opera house, playhouse, or vaudeville theater. The kits were then assembled at home and plays performed for family members and guests, sometimes with live musical accompaniment. The...
Losing the Nobel Prize with Brian Keating
5/21/2018
Cosmologist and author of "Losing the Nobel Prize" Brian Keating tells the inside story of BICEP2's mesmerizing discovery and the scientific drama that ensued in this interview with science fiction author David Brin. Keating describes a journey of revelation and discovery, bringing to life the highly competitive, take-no-prisoners, publish-or-perish world of modern science. Along the way, he provocatively argues that the Nobel Prize, instead of advancing scientific...
Improving Openness and Innovation in Scholarly Communication with Brian Nosek
5/12/2018
Brian Nosek, co-founder and executive director of the Center for Open Science, outlines the most urgent challenges in achieving a more open science future and how the scholarly communication community can change practices to validate and recognize open research. Nosek, a professor of psychology at the University of Virginia, is presented by the UC San Diego Library. Recorded on 04.19.2018.
Your Microbiome, Your Health
5/7/2018
UC San Diego Professor of Pediatrics and Computer Science & Engineering Rob Knight illustrates the enormous presence of the microbiome in humans. Knight is presented by the Library Channel at UC San Diego.
East West Street: On the Origins of "Genocide" and "Crimes Against Humanity" with Philippe Sands -- Holocaust Living History Workshop -- The Library Channel
3/19/2018
In describing his new book, "East West Street" author Philippe Sands looks at the personal and intellectual evolution of the two men who simultaneously originated the ideas of "genocide" and "crimes against humanity," both of whom, not knowing the other, studied at the same university in a now-obscure city that had once been known as "the little Paris of Ukraine," a city variously called Lemberg, Lwów, Lvov, or Lviv. It is also a...
Postcard Stories
2/28/2018
This evening is inspired by the short postcard stories that magazine editor George Hay encouraged in the 1970's. He dared such authors as Arthur C. Clarke to send sci-fi stories that easily fit onto a postcard. In that spirit, Geisel Library invited writers to submit fantasy or science fiction pieces of no more than 250 words, to be read aloud.
Confronting Political Intimidation and Public Bullying with Roddey Reid
2/5/2018
In "Confronting Political Intimidation and Public Bullying: A Citizen's Handbook for the Trump Era and Beyond," author and Literature professor emeritus Roddey Reid traces the origins of the current toxic environment back some 30 years to a culture of abuse in the workplace, media and the political arena. In conversation with sociologist Akos Rona-Tas, Reid reviews the strategies and dynamics of contemporary bullying: how it works, the danger it causes, and the lessons...
Dirt is Good: The Advantage of Germs For Your Child's Developing Immune System with Rob Knight
11/27/2017
In discussing his new book, "Dirt is Good: The Advantage of Germs For Your Child's Developing Immune System," author and UC San Diego Professor of Pediatrics and Computer Science & Engineering Rob Knight explains how the microbiome works and offers guidance for parents on boosting their children's health. Knight is presented by the Library Channel at UC San Diego. Recorded on 10/24/2017.
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