The Holocaust Living History Workshop
The Holocaust Living History Workshop, a partnership between the Jewish Studies Program and the Library at UC San Diego, aims to preserve the memory of the victims and survivors by presenting public talks with leading scholars of the Holocaust.
Against All Odds: Born in Mauthausen with Eva Clarke -- Holocaust Living History Workshop -- The Library Channel
7/2/2018
What does it mean to be born in a concentration camp, arguably one of the most inhospitable places on earth? Eva Clarke was one of three "miracle babies" who saw the light of day in KZ Mauthausen in Austria. Nine days after her birth, the Second World War ended. As a newborn, Eva's chances of survival were extremely slim; against all odds, she lived, making her and her mother Anka the only survivors of their extended family. In 1948, they emigrated from Prague to the UK and settled in...
Rising from the Rubble: Creating POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews with Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett
4/20/2018
Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett explores the creation of the POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews on the site of the former Warsaw Ghetto and its multimedia narrative exhibition honoring the lives of those who have passed. Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, a professor emerita at New York University, is also the chief curator of the Core Exhibition at the POLIN Museum. She is presented here by the Jewish Studies Program and the Library at UC San Diego. Recorded on 04/11/2018.
East West Street: On the Origins of "Genocide" and "Crimes Against Humanity" with Philippe Sands -- Holocaust Living History Workshop -- The Library Channel
3/19/2018
In describing his new book, "East West Street" author Philippe Sands looks at the personal and intellectual evolution of the two men who simultaneously originated the ideas of "genocide" and "crimes against humanity," both of whom, not knowing the other, studied at the same university in a now-obscure city that had once been known as "the little Paris of Ukraine," a city variously called Lemberg, Lwów, Lvov, or Lviv. It is also a spellbinding family...
The Nazis Next Door with Eric Lichtblau -- Holocaust Living History Workshop -- The Library Channel
6/26/2017
In his highly-acclaimed book, The Nazis Next Door, Eric Lichtblau tells the shocking and shameful story of how America became a safe haven for Hitler's men. Lichtblau explains here how it was possible for thousands of Nazis -- from concentration camp guards to high-level officers in the Third Reich -- to move to the U.S. after WWII, and quietly settle into new lives as Americans. Some of them gained entry as self-styled refugees, while others enjoyed the help and protection of the CIA, the FBI,...
Archiving Atrocity: The International Tracing Service and Holocaust Research with Suzanne Brown-Fleming Holocaust Living History Workshop -- The Library Channel
5/8/2017
The International Tracing Service, one of the world's largest Holocaust-related archival repositories, holds millions of documents detailing the many forms of persecution that transpired during the Nazi era and their continuing repercussions. Based on her recently published book, "Nazi Persecution and Postwar Repercussions: The International Tracing Service Archive and Holocaust Research," Suzanne Brown-Fleming provides new insights into human decision-making in genocidal settings, the...
The Voice of Your Brother’s Blood: The Murder of a Town in Eastern Galicia with Omer Bartov: Holocaust Living History Workshop -- The Library Channel
3/3/2017
Omer Bartov, the John P. Birkelund Distinguished Professor of European History and German Studies at Brown University, explores the dynamics of the horrifying genocidal violence which took place in the East Galician town of Buczacz following the German conquest of the region in 1941 and its subsequent erasure from local memory. For centuries, Poles, Ukrainians, and Jews coexisted in the region, but tragically, by the time the town was liberated in 1944, the entire Jewish population had been...
Anatomy of Malice: The Enigma of the Nazi War Criminals with Joel Dimsdale -- The Library Channel
7/18/2016
In his new book, Anatomy of Malice: The Enigma of the Nazi War Criminals, author Joel Dimsdale draws on decades of experience as a psychiatrist and the dramatic advances within psychiatry, psychology and neuroscience since the Nuremberg Trials to take a fresh look at four Nazi war criminals: Robert Ley, Hermann Goring, Julius Streicher and Rudolf Hess. Dimsdale, an emeritus professor of psychiatry at UC San Diego, is presented by the UC San Diego Library.
Living with the Holocaust with Tom Segev -- Holocaust Living History Workshop -- Library Channel
7/11/2016
Born in Jerusalem to parents who had fled Nazi Germany, Israeli journalist Tom Segev is a leading figure among the so-called New Historians, who have challenged many of Israel's traditional narratives or "founding myths." His books include, "The Seventh Million: The Israelis and the Holocaust" (2000); "One Palestine Complete: Jews and Arabs under the British Mandate" (2000); "1967: Israel, the War, and the Year that Transformed the Middle East" (2006); and...
Charlotte Salomon’s Interventions with Darcy Buerkle -- Holocaust Living History Workshop -- The Library Channel
4/19/2016
Writer and artist Charlotte Salomon, the daughter of a highly cultivated Jewish family in Berlin, was deported to Auschwitz and murdered at the age of 26. In her final work "Life? or Theatre?" Salomon envisioned the circumstances surrounding the eight suicides in her family, all but one of them women. Darcy C. Buerkle, an Associate Professor of History at Smith College, explores Salomon's tragic life as she discusses her remarkable book, "Nothing Happened: Charlotte Salomon and an...
Whatever Happened to Klimt’s Golden Lady? with E. Randol Schoenberg -- Holocaust Living History Workshop -- UC San Diego Library Channel
6/5/2015
E. Randol Schoenberg, the grandson of the composer Arnold Schoenberg, is an expert in handling cases involving looted art and the recovery of property stolen by the Nazi authorities during the Holocaust. He tells the story here of his most prominent case, "Republic of Austria v. Altmann" which resulted in the successful return of six paintings by Gustav Klimt, including the "Golden Lady," to their rightful owners. Recorded on 05/06/2015.
Growing Up in the Shadow of the Holocaust -- Holocaust Living History Workshop -- The Library Channel
5/8/2015
Since the defeat of the Nazis in WWII, Germans have been forced to confront their "unmasterable past." What was it like to grow up in a divided country burdened with the legacy of genocide? How does one deal with the knowledge of one's people's complicity in mass murder, and how does this knowledge affect one's identity? Primary witnesses of both German and Jewish backgrounds explore answers to these questions. Panelists include Frank Biess, Deborah Hertz, Margrit Frolich and Brian...
Hitler’s Furies: Ordinary Women? Featuring Wendy Lower - Holocaust Living History -- The Library Channel
12/8/2014
Award-winning historian Wendy Lower discusses the lives and experience of German women in the Nazi killing fields. Her study chillingly debunks the age-old myth of the German woman as mother and breeder, removed from the big world of politics and war. The women Lower labels "furies" humiliated their victims, plundered their goods, and often killed them, and like many of their male counterparts, they got away with murder. Lower is the John K. Roth professor of history at Claremont...
Porrajmos: The Romani and the Holocaust with Ian Hancock - Holocaust Living History -- The Library Channel
6/17/2014
The Holocaust claimed anywhere between 500,000 and 1.5 million Romani lives, a tragedy the Romani people and Sinti refer to as the Porrajmos, or "the Devouring." Notwithstanding the scope of the catastrophe, the Romani genocide was often ignored or minimized until Ian Hancock and others exposed this misfortune. A Romani-born British citizen, activist, and scholar, Hancock has done more than anyone to raise awareness about the Romani people during World War II. Now a professor at the...
The Anatomy of Malice: Rorschach Results from Nuremberg War Criminals
6/10/2013
Forty years ago, Dr. Joel Dimsdale started researching concentration camp survivors. Little did he know where his journey of discovery would lead him. After a visit from a Nuremberg executioner, he switched from studying victims to perpetrators. His latest research is based on an analysis of Rorschach inkblot tests administered at the Nuremberg War Crimes Trial. Using extensive archival data, Dimsdale reviews what the Nuremberg Rorschachs can (and cannot) tell us about the Nazi mass murderers....
 

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