We Are CSE
The diversity of research and people in UC San Diego's Department of Computer Science and Engineering.

Date: 7/26/2018
David Kohlbrenner is a PhD student at UC San Diego working with Sysnet and CryptoSec advised by Hovav Shacham. His research focuses on how hardware design impacts software security. David's work bridges gaps in understanding between hardware and software to build systems that are deserving of trust. As part of his research efforts, he has worked extensively with web browsers to demonstrate new vulnerabilities and integrate new defenses. Previously, David received a B.S. in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon University and co-founded the San Diego-based startup Somerset Recon. In 2018, David graduated from UC San Diego and is now a postdoc at UC Berkeley.

Date: 4/20/2018
Nadia Polikarpova is an assistant professor at CSE, and a member of the Programming Systems group. She received her Ph.D. in computer science from ETH Zurich in 2014. She then spent three years as a postdoctoral researcher at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Polikarpova's work spans the areas of programming languages and formal methods; in particular, she is interested in building practical tools and techniques that make it easier for programmers to construct secure and reliable software. Her agenda is to exploit the growing power of automated logical reasoning to build next-generation programming languages, in which the programmer simply states high-level system requirements---such as safety, security, or performance criteria---and the language infrastructure takes on the error-prone task of enforcing these requirements.

Date: 4/20/2018
Manmohan Chandraker is an assistant professor at the CSE department of the University of California, San Diego. He received a PhD from UC San Diego and was a postdoctoral scholar at UC Berkeley. His research interests are in computer vision, machine learning and graphics-based vision, with applications to autonomous driving and human-computer interfaces. His works have received the Marr Prize Honorable Mention for Best Paper at ICCV 2007, the 2009 CSE Dissertation Award for Best Thesis at UCSD, a PAMI special issue on best papers of CVPR 2011, the Best Paper Award at CVPR 2014 and the 2018 NSF CAREER Award. He has served as an Area Chair at CVPR, ICCV, AAAI and ICVGIP, associate editor at JAIR, senior PC member at IJCAI and tutorials chair at 3DV.

Date: 4/20/2018
Ariana is a PhD student at UC San Diego, where she works with the Sysnet, CryptoSec, and CNS groups at UCSD, as well as the Center for Evidence-based Security Research (CESR). She is advised by Geoff Voelker and Stefan Savage. As an undergrad, she started her academic journey in a security lab as an coder. She soon realized that the world of security would be an enthralling space that has repercussions for everyone that uses a computer today, and after doing some coding, she then moved more into a research-oriented role. She discovered that one of security's problems revolved around users and how users interact with our various security mechanisms; and what good are our security mechanisms if they fail to protect people? She then decided to dive into the intersection of usable security and empirical analysis, or how we can use environmental studies to determine user behavior, where is it going wrong, and how we can fix it. This is the philosophy that drives her research

Date: 4/20/2018
Max Mellette is a postdoctoral researcher in the CSE department at UC San Diego working with George Porter on data center network architecture. He received his Ph.D. in Photonics from the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at UC San Diego, where he worked on optical switching hardware advised by Joseph Ford. Before that, he received a Bachelor in Engineering Physics, also from UC San Diego. Max's research focuses on using optical switching to improve the scalability, power consumption, and cost of data center networks. This involves working at the physical layer to design and build novel optical switches up through the transport layer to design high-performance network architectures compatible with those switches.

Date: 4/20/2018
Steven Rick is a CSE PhD student advised by Professor Nadir Weibel. As a member of the UC San Diego Design Lab and Human-Centered and Ubiquitous Computing Lab, his research lies at the intersection of technology, design, and human interaction. By using increasingly pervasive sensing and computing hardware, he seeks to understand the impact that communication has on interpersonal interaction. More specifically, how behavior influences the way doctors and patients work together. This research makes sense of interaction between patients and their care team while exploring opportunities for thoughtful design to intervene and promote self-reflection, reduction in bias, or better teamwork. Having earned a B.S. in Cognitive Science, Steven values interdisciplinary approaches to solving hard human problems, and believes technology should be thought of as an ally, not a tool nor replacement for humans.

Date: 4/20/2018
Angelique Taylor is a PhD student in the Healthcare Robotics Lab at the Computer Science and Engineering Department at UC San Diego. Angelique completed two Bachelor's degrees in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the University of Missouri-Columbia, where she worked on machine learning research and developed an interest in learning algorithms. Since then, she has become interested in machine learning methods that can be used for interactive agents, leading her to focus on research in human-robot interaction. Working under the direction of Dr. Laurel Riek, her research lies at the intersection of computer vision, robotics, and artificial intelligence. Her work aims to enable robots to interact and work with groups of people in real-world environments. She is a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow, Arthur J. Schmitt Presidential Fellow, GEM Fellow, and Google Anita Borg Memorial Scholar.