Health and Medicine

Series

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Premiere Date: 8/26/2015
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One day, we might be able to access the Internet through a ceiling light. Researchers at the Fraunhofer Heinrich Hertz Institute in Berlin have developed a new optical wireless technology that doesn't need a traditional radio-based router. Instead, the digital data is transmitted via light. The researchers developed a special modulator to regulate the LED light source, and a photodiode captures the light on the laptop. The new technology is especially promising for settings where radio wireless is undesirable, or where it can't reach - including places like offices, hospitals and aircraft cabins. Another benefit is security. Because every wall or opaque surface acts as a firewall, optical wireless technology is almost impossible to wiretap.
Premiere Date: 8/26/2015
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The Upper Middle Rhine valley in Germany has been popular with tourists since the beginning of the 19th century, with the arrival of the first steamships. Hundreds of thousands of visitors flock to the region every year to view the some 40 hilltop castles and fortresses in this region, which was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
Premiere Date: 8/26/2015
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People with a large number of moles have an increased risk of skin cancer. London skin researcher Veronique Bataille wanted to find out why, and she made a remarkable discovery. People who have lots of moles have a very particular type of skin; it ages more slowly, is less sensitive to sunlight and it doesn't develop wrinkles as easily. Bataille discovered the cause in the subject's cells. The chromosomes carrying the genetic information looked unusually young under the microscope, as can be seen in length of the chromosome ends - the telomeres - which normally become shorter as cells ages. So, the conclusion for anyone with moles: they'll keep you young, but will unfortunately increase your risk of skin cancer.
Premiere Date: 8/20/2015
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145 countries took part in the Expo in Milan, and 60 pavilions were specifically built for it. Architects were faced with the problem of building representative structures on a small area, while keeping the theme of the Expo in mind: sustainability.
Premiere Date: 8/19/2015
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Although some still argue about the causes, climatologists now widely agree that global warming is a fact. And 2014 was the warmest year recorded since such studies began 130 years ago. Researchers from the Alfred Wegener Institute in Bremerhaven are studying the effects climate change is having on the world's largest ice cap at the South Pole. Even though the region is widely considered to be stable in terms of climate, they've discovered some sobering evidence that this impression could be wrong. Tomorrow Today takes you to the planet's most hostile yet vital environment.
Premiere Date: 8/12/2015
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On this edition: breathtaking underwater videos, animal magic from Finland, a Danish restaurant with a difference, Europe's waterslides and the Swiss canton of Thurgau.
Premiere Date: 8/12/2015
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Fish showed up in the fossil record about 500 million years ago, and today, they are the most diverse group of vertebrate animals on the planet. Phil Hastings, Scripps Professor, and Curator of the SIO Marine Vertebrate Collection, will discuss the global diversity of fishes.
Premiere Date: 8/12/2015
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Hailstorms wreak havoc and cause millions of euro worth of damage each year. Until now, meteorologists have had very little technology to monitor the weather phenomenon. Now scientists at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology are testing sensor plates designed to transform hailstones' kinetic energy into a digital signal. The data can be used to calculate how many hailstones are falling, and their size and speed.
Premiere Date: 8/6/2015
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William Gerwick and Paul Jensen of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego present their research on marine biomedicine and marine drug discovery. Recorded on 05/11/2015.
Premiere Date: 8/6/2015
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At the end of the ski season, the danger of avalanches in the mountains increases. Viennese researchers have developed a simple, reliable system that could in the future warn people when avalanches are released. On high-risk slopes, they're laying fiber optic cables to transmit laser beams. If an avalanche rolls over the cable, sensors pick up the change in pressure and send a warning signal to skiers on the slopes or to people in endangered villages. The lead time is short - only about a minute. But that could be enough to save lives.
Premiere Date: 8/5/2015
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In this edition: meet German painter Georg Baselitz at the Art Biennale in Venice, take a stroll around the medieval city of Bruges in Belgium, and take a look behind the scenes of some of Europe's most successful food blogs. Plus, this year's Bonn Jazz Festival features a number of strong female artists.
Premiere Date: 8/5/2015
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Stephen Mayfield, the director of the California Center for Algae Biotechnology and professor of molecular biology at UC San Diego , presents his latest research on biofuels in algae and photosynthetic bacteria. Mayfield's plenary talk was part of the 2015 Cavendish Global Impact Forum. Recorded on 05/14/2015.
Premiere Date: 8/3/2015
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The world today offers a contrast between zones of peace and war. Since 1945, much of the developed world has experienced unprecedented prosperity and nearly uninterrupted peace. Some conflicts, however, are chronic. What explains this contrast? One major factor is world commerce. In a thriving environment, war becomes pointless - peace is a product of wealth and efficiency. But as UC San Diego Political Science Professor Erik Gartzke explains, there are forces at work in Russia and China that may weaken or undermine international peace in the coming decades. Gartzke is presented by the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at UC San Diego.
Premiere Date: 8/3/2015
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Speaker presents theoretical and experimental evidence that, contrary to conventional wisdom in invasion biology, genetics plays an important role in invasion dynamics of insects. Ladybird beetles, flour beetles, and white flies are used as model systems.
Premiere Date: 7/31/2015
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Social dysfunction is a universal feature of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) that emerges early in childhood. Research in the McPartland Lab explores the developmental interaction between early-occurring vulnerabilities in social behavior and subsequent experience in children with ASD. Dr. McPartland will describe an approach using clinical insights to guide neuroscientific study towards the development of translational applications. The lecture will review a series of studies to test and expand upon the predictions of the social motivation hypothesis of ASD. This developmental model offers direct implications for meaningfully characterizing subgroups of individuals with autism, designing targeted treatments, and elucidating the neural underpinnings of effective intervention.
Premiere Date: 7/31/2015
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Overview of the effects and implications of implementation of the California Common Core State Standards on schools with students with ASD, autism spectrum disorder. Social and intellectual deficits impede the students' ability to learn through traditional teaching methods and techniques, so teachers are urged to devise their own lesson plans and tailor instruction to the individual needs of the students in their classrooms. Recorded on 8/8/2014.
Premiere Date: 7/31/2015
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Comorbidity among neurodevelopmental disorders is more common than not because they share etiologic and cognitive risk factors. Methods will be presented for finding these shared risk factors, which are relevant for diagnostic formulation. Disorders discussed include dyslexia, speech sound disorder, Language Impairment and ADHD. Recorded on 8/8/2014.
Premiere Date: 7/31/2015
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The Artist's Field Library is a series of video essays performed as academic lectures that explore the mutually transformative relationship between art and the university. Part One uses the analogy of artists as talking birds and draws on research from cognitive ethology, linguistics, and film studies to ask, what kind of knowledge does art produce? The visuals for the lecture consist of drawn diagrams and short structural videos that illustrate, but perhaps complicate, various points of the lecture.
Premiere Date: 7/31/2015
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Understanding the impact of an invasive vector, including the transmission, behavior & pathogen spread. Matt Daugherty of UC Riverside discusses the impact of disease-carrying insects on plant and human health and major crops in California.
Premiere Date: 7/31/2015
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