Health and Medicine

Series

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This time on Euromaxx: The 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall, remembering autumn '89 in pictures; taking a look at the Border of Lights installation; talking to novelist Ken Follett and finding out how German reunification changed people's lives.
Premiere Date: 2/25/2015
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Pipe, cap and cape - that's how Sherlock Holmes is usually depicted. After over 120 years, the fictional detective is as fascinating as ever. The Museum of London has dedicated an exhibition to this urban legend who first appeared in print in 1887, conceived by author Arthur Conan Doyle.
Premiere Date: 2/18/2015
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Chef Johann Lafer is in New York City with his Lafer's food@ucation project, why Andalusia in Spain is well worth a trip, British Alex Chinneck turns facades into works of art, Finnish Author Ulla-Lena Lundberg, and Euromaxx's photo contest winner.
Premiere Date: 2/11/2015
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Dr. Loris Hwang, UCSF Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine, looks at what to consider in choosing a contraceptive method for a teen or young adult. She explains what medical conditions are treated using hormonal contraception and which methods are most effective. Recorded on 11/19/2014.
Premiere Date: 2/9/2015
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In this special edition of OperaTalk, host Nicolas Reveles is your guide for John Adams' NIXON IN CHINA, an exhilarating recounting of the President's historic mission of rapprochement with Chairman Mao. "Only Nixon could go to China," and only Dr. Reveles could provide these entertaining insights into one of the most acclaimed operas of the 20th century. Recorded on 2/2/2015.
Premiere Date: 2/6/2015
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Located in the Mediterranean this charming disputed British territory is where both man and monkeys make their home along the world famous rock. Millions of tourists annually visit the less than three square mile area on the peninsula at the entrance of the Mediterranean near the African coast.
Premiere Date: 2/4/2015
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Producer Lisa Bruce and screenwriter/producer Anthony McCarten join host Matt Ryan for a lively discussion of their film The Theory of Everything. Starring Eddie Redmayne and Felicity Jones, the movie follows the extraordinary story of one of the world's greatest living minds, the renowned astrophysicist Stephen Hawking, who falls deeply in love with fellow Cambridge student Jane Wilde.
Premiere Date: 2/3/2015 Hits/Views: 74,399
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Eating disorders are highly prevalent among the adolescent population. They are life threatening and require urgent attention. Daniel Le Grange, UCSF Professor of Psychiatry and of Pediatrics, Division of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, looks at the prevalence and mortality of eating disorders. He discusses inpatient and outpatient treatment and the role of the family. Recorded on 11/12/2014.
Premiere Date: 2/2/2015
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Lincoln Chen, President, China Medical Board and Jaime Sepulveda, Executive Director, Global Health Sciences, UCSF conclude the 2014 Conference on the Science of Global Health: What's Next? Recorded on 10/02/2014.
Premiere Date: 1/30/2015
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One hundred years ago, the Maserati brothers founded their first car workshop in Bologna. Take a look at the celebrations to mark the centenary of the Italian company.
Premiere Date: 1/28/2015
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No country in human history has reduced mortality rates as quickly as Rwanda in the last 15 years. But are the circumstances that have allowed Rwanda to make this progress unique? Ambassador Eric Goosby moderates a discussion with Paulin Basinga of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and Paul Farmer of Partners in Health about what is replicable from Rwanda and what other countries might learn from its experience. Recorded on 10/02/2014.
Premiere Date: 1/28/2015
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Anorexia is the 3rd most common chronic illness among adolescents. Research shows that early detection and prompt intervention may prevent as many as two-thirds of patients from developing a more serious eating disorder. Dr. Sara Buckelew discusses how to identify an eating disorder, early intervention and prevention. Recorded on 11/05/2014.
Premiere Date: 1/26/2015
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Eight Berkeley Lab scientists took the stage and in 8 minutes each explained the latest science on topics from solar-powered vaccine refrigerators and cool roof maps to radiation pills and space dust. Katie Antypas - Energy Efficient Supercomputing, Ronnen Levinson -Cool Roofs Through Time and Space, Musahid Ahmed - Combustion Science for Cleaner Fuels, Andrew Westphal - First Rocks from Outside the Solar System, Ben Brown - Enhancing Human and Planetary Health Through Responsible Innovation, Sylvain Costes - Promoting a Healthier DNA, Rebecca Abergel - A pill to treat people exposed to radioactive materials, Shashi Buluswar - Portable Solar Vaccine Refrigerator.
Premiere Date: 1/26/2015
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Haydn is widely acknowledged as the father of the string quartet, but his contributions to the development of the piano literature have been unjustly overlooked. His groundbreaking efforts in the piano trio form are most evident in the Trio in C Major, composed in 1795. Recorded on 8/19/2014.
Premiere Date: 1/23/2015 Hits/Views: 7,965
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The release of the new Agatha Christie book is called "The Monogram Murders" and it is written by Sophie Hannah. Agatha Christie wrote many novels including world famous titles like "And Then there Were None", and "Death On the Nile." Her most famous investigator is Hercule Poirot who first appeared in 1920. Despite his author having killed him off in 1975, Christie's family is now allowing him to rise again.
Premiere Date: 1/21/2015
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Darwin Berg hosts a conversation with pre-eminent neuroscientist Nick Spitzer about his work and the future of neuroscience.
Premiere Date: 1/21/2015
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Joyce Maynard has been a writer of both fiction and nonfiction since the age of 18. Her memoir "At Home in the World" has been translated into fifteen languages. Her eight novels include the newly released "After Her," as well as "To Die For" and the New York Times bestseller, "Labor Day." In addition to writing, Maynard performs frequently as a storyteller with The Moth in New York City, and is the founder of the Lake Atitlan (Guatemala) Writers' Workshop. Recorded on 10/09/2014.
Premiere Date: 1/21/2015
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All the world's bananas are clones of a single plant. This poses a problem because that makes them all susceptible to the same pests. That is why pesticides are used so frequently on the fruit, but these also cause damage to the environment. Agriculture specialists at the University of Kassel have discovered a variety of banana in Oman that is genetically different from the ubiquitous, commercially available banana and is resistant to pests. The researchers are now trying to find out if its defensive characteristics can be transferred to other bananas.
Premiere Date: 1/21/2015
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Innovative new products have completely transformed how we prevent and treat conditions like HIV, malaria, meningitis, hepatitis, diarrheal disease, and respiratory infection, saving countless lives. And yet, the challenges to successful innovation in life sciences continue to rise. Leaders here describe what is needed to enable biomedical science to be translated into life-saving products. Speakers include Colin Boyle, Deputy Director, Global Health Sciences, UCSF; Chris Elias, President, Global Development Program, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; John Martin, Chairman & CEO, Gilead Sciences; Bill Rutter, Chairman & CEO, Synergenics, LLC; and Tachi Yamada, Executive Vice President and Chief Medical & Scientific Officer, Takeda Pharmaceuticals. Recorded on 10/02/2014.
Premiere Date: 1/21/2015
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Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most severe form of muscular dystrophy that affects 1 in 3500 boys and leads to progressive muscle degeneration and death by the second decade of life. It's been nearly thirty years since dystrophin, the mutated gene that causes DMD, was identified. Without the large structural protein encoded by dystrophin, the muscle cell walls become stressed, leaky and eventually degenerate. A mouse model of DMD with a naturally occurring mutation in the dystrophin gene has been available nearly 1989. A lot of therapies have been tested in this model and then tried in humans and not worked. In this video Dr. Helen Blau, a CIRM grantee from Stanford University, reports that her lab has generated a new mouse model that more accurately mimics the Duchenne symptoms observed in humans. This breakthrough opens up opportunities to better understand the disease and to develop novel therapies.
Premiere Date: 1/20/2015
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