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From neuropathology to molecular target to clinical treatments, where are we on the road to finding an effective treatment for Alzheimer's disease? Howard Feldman, MD, FRCP(C), a neurologist noted for his original research in geriatric cognitive disorders and expertise in large-scale clinical trials, walks through the latest research and shares some tips on brain health.

What exactly is it about a word that makes it dirty? And how does our sense of the profane change over time? In this edition of Up Next, host Marty Lasden explores the science of swearing with Benjamin K. Bergen, a cognitive science professor at UC San Diego, whose new book on the subject has drawn rave reviews from The New York Times, The Atlantic Monthly, and the Economist, among others. His book is called: "What the F: What Swearing Reveals About Our Language, Our Brains, and Ourselves."

Charles Nunn (Duke Univ) identifies selective pressures in this talk that may play a role in favoring shorter sleep in humans, and considers the consequences of these evolutionary changes for understanding human sleep disorders, health across the lifespan, and health disparities. Recorded on 10/14/2016.

How are modern day humans adapting to climate change? To find the answer, archaeologists are studying how human societies have responded to environmental changes in the past. Isabel Rivera-Collazo focuses on understanding human resilience and adaptation to past environmental change as a lens through which we can view the future. Finding answers involves diverse disciplines, including archeology, anthropology, geomorphology, ecosystem dynamics and climate science. Join us to learn how her work at Scripps Oceanography and in UC San Diego's Department of Archeology are changing the way we view climate change and its impacts on society.

Three fascinating presentations show how explorations into synaptic development and genetic mutation are revealing pathways to better interventions for neurological impairment, from Schizophrenia and Amblyopia to Autism. Recorded on 12/02/2016.

MIT's Mark Bear presents a fascinating account of how understanding neural plasticity, or the ability to modify the function of neurons, led to a novel treatment for visual impairment in Amblyopia, and may reveal pathways to treat other neurological conditions. Recorded on 12/02/2016.

Eric Siemers, MD, Distinguished Medical Fellow at Eli Lilly and Company joins William Mobley, MD, PhD to discuss clinical trails for Alzheimer's disease. He explains the trial design, results, and future implications of the EXPEDITION3 trial for people with with mild dementia due to Alzheimer's disease. Learn more about potential treatments in the clinical trials pipeline that may impact both the symptoms and pathologies of Alzheimer's disease.

2016 was a good and bad year for efforts to tackle climate change. The good news is that 120 parties have ratified the Paris Convention; the bad news is the emergence of post-truth politics and the associated denial of the evidence that climate change is a threat to our future. Leading environmentalist and Member of UK House of Lords John Krebs discusses the trends and their implications for global efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Recorded on 01/25/2017.

Skin is the primary interface between ourselves and our environment. Nina Jablonski, Pennsylvania State University, looks at what makes our skin unique and, perhaps, more important than we realize. Recorded on 02/28/2017.
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