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Berkeley Lab's Science at the Theater traveled across the Bay to San Francisco's Herbst Theater for a star turn by two of the Lab's Nobel laureates. George Smoot received the 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics for the "discovery of the blackbody form and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation." Saul Perlmutter received the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics for "for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae." The host for the conversation was KQED's Michael Krasny.

We're entering a new era in biology thanks to stunning images, powerful predictive tools, and a pioneering spirit. Four of Lawrence Berkeley National Lab scientists discuss what this means and what the future holds.

In the last few decades, new sources of evidence have continued to indicate that male violence has played an important role in shaping behavior in the human lineage. The frequency and nature of such violence varies widely among populations and over time raises questions about the factors responsible for the variation. This symposium takes a fresh look at the causes and consequences of variation in aggression, both between and within species. Carol Ember (Yale Univ) begins with a discussion about Resource Unpredictability, Socialization, and War, followed by Polly Wiessner on Violence: What's Culture Got to Do with It?, and Robert Kelly (Univ of Wyoming) who asks Do Hunter-Gatherers Tell Us About Human Nature? Recorded on 05/16/2014.

UC San Diego Computer Science and Engineering (CSE) Department Chair Rajesh Gupta, an expert in cyber-physical systems, kicks off a conversation with two cyber security experts from the computer-science faculty in UC San Diego's Jacobs School of Engineering: Prof. Stefan Savage, and Prof. Hovav Shacham. Savage and colleagues generated controversy and debate over public policy after they demonstrated the vulnerability of modern automobiles to attack from hackers who can take advantage of internal as well as external digital components and systems in today's cars. Most recently, Prof. Shacham uncovered security vulnerabilities involving the full-body backscatter, X-ray scanners deployed at entrances to airports, train stations and other public places.
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