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Tracing the evolution of the human diet from our earliest ancestors can lead to a better understanding of human adaptation in the past. It may also offer clues to the origin of many health problems we currently face, such as obesity and chronic disease. This fascinating series of talks focuses on the changing diets of our ancestors and what role these dietary transitions played in the evolution of humans. Here Mary C. Stiner (Univ of Arizona) discusses Archaic Human Diets followed by Alyssa Crittenden (Univ of Nevada, Las Vegas) on Current Hunter-Gatherer Diets and Steven Leigh (Univ of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) on Diets and Microbes in Primates.

Tracing the evolution of the human diet from our earliest ancestors can lead to a better understanding of human adaptation in the past. It may also offer clues to the origin of many health problems we currently face, such as obesity and chronic disease. This fascinating series of talks focuses on the changing diets of our ancestors and what role these dietary transitions played in the evolution of humans. Leslie C. Aiello (Wenner-Gren Foundation) begins with An Overview of Diet and Evolution, followed by Richard Wrangham (Harvard Univ) on Fire, Starch, Meat, and Honey Steven Leigh (Univ of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) on Diets and Microbes in Primates.

Tracing the evolution of the human diet from our earliest ancestors can lead to a better understanding of human adaptation in the past. It may also offer clues to the origin of many health problems we currently face, such as obesity and chronic disease. This fascinating series of talks focuses on the changing diets of our ancestors and what role these dietary transitions played in the evolution of humans. Here Clark Spencer Larsen (Ohio State Univ) discusses The Impact of Agriculture on Human Evolution, followed by Barry Bogin (Loughborough Univ) on The Impact of Globalization on Children's Nutrition and Alyssa Crittenden (Univ of Nevada, Las Vegas) on Current Hunter-Gatherer Diets.

Visual Artist Sheldon Brown presents a multimedia tour de force exploring how art and science illuminate the freedom of imagination. Using examples from his extensive body of work, the founding director of the Arthur C. Clarke Center for the Human Imagination challenges this audience to think about how developments in computation have reframed our understanding of the world and how new digital methods are affecting the means and modes of culture. Brown's talk is the final installment of the "Degrees of Freedom" lecture series presented by the Division of Arts and Humanities at UC San Diego.

Back in the 1990s, Jeffrey Hawkins became both rich and famous when he invented the Palm Pilot-a device that in no small way ushered in a whole new era of mobile computing. These days, though, he's on a far more ambitious mission. His goal: to build a machine that can think and reason on its own by mimicking the workings of the human brain. In this edition of Up Next, Hawkins opines on the both risks and rewards of artificial intelligence.
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