Public Affairs


Featured This Month

New Videos and Podcasts
> more videos and podcasts in Public Affairs
Popular Programs
> more popular programs in Public Affairs
Public Affairs airing this week

Renowned author and Middlebury College Professor Jay Parini charms his dinner audience with selections from his "Promised Land: Thirteen Books That Changed America." From "The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin" and "Walden," through "Uncle Tom's Cabin" to "How to Win Friends and Influence People" and "The Feminine Mystique," Parini offers a compelling narrative on the evolution of American culture. Parini was the keynote speaker at the UC San Diego Library's "Dinner in the Library," which takes place annually in Geisel Library.

Razelle Kurzrock, the director of the Center for Personalized Cancer Therapy at the Moores Cancer Center at UC San Diego, presents breakthroughs in genomics and targeted therapies that are being used in clinics and have the potential to revolutionize the practice of oncology. However, to realize that potential, Dr. Kurzrock argues that the old paradigms for treating patients and designing clinical trials must be replaced with approaches that target the abnormal genes in individual tumors and use advanced technological tools to match each patient with the best drug for his or her specific cancer. Dr. Kurzrock was presented by the Center for Ethics in Science and Technology in San Diego.

Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto took office in December of 2012 promising a new approach to curb drug trafficking that would be both more effective and less violent than the strategy of his predecessor. The new enforcement plan seems to be working but is it sustainable? David Mares, director of the Center for Iberian and Latin American Studies at UC San Diego, argues that the answer is fundamental to Mexico's future and of great interest to the United States. Mares is presented by the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute and the Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies at UC San Diego.

From Roosevelt to Clinton, many American presidents tried to pass universal coverage but failed. Nevertheless, Obama and the Democratic leadership chose to tackle the issue again and succeeded in getting the Affordable Care (ACA) law passed. Stuart Altman, Former Assistant Secretary of the US department of Health, Education and Welfare explores health reform - what made it necessary, the competing proposals that existed before the ACA was passed, and if it will slow healthcare spending. Recorded on 02/06/2014.

UC San Diego Professor Susan Shirk and Gordon Hanson join CIDE's Carlos Elizondo and Arturo Sarukhan, the former Mexican Ambassador to the United States, for a discussion on how Mexico can strengthen its economic ties with Asia in this final panel of the Mexico Moving Forward 2014 symposium. Recorded on 03/06/2014.

Conversations host Harry Kreisler welcomes New Yorker staff writer George Packer for a discussion of the impact of Silicon Valley on society and politics. Topics covered include: the implications of technology for the status of the American worker, for American culture, and for economic inequality. Amazon and the consequences of its business model for the publishing industry are discussed. President Obama's response to the 2008 economic crisis is also analyzed. Recorded on 03/19/2014.

UC Berkeley economist Sol Hsiang details the economic risks of climate change -- region by region -- with expected jumps in mortality rates, violent crime, worker fatigue and energy consumption as the days become hotter throughout the United States. Hsiang was co-lead author of the American Climate Prospectus, the risk analysis study that led to "The Risky Business Report: The Economic Risks of Climate Change in the United States," the bipartisan research initiative commissioned by financiers Henry Paulson, Tom Steyer and Michael Bloomberg. Using national maps that illustrate the range of the rising heat, Hsiang explains the importance of understanding these potential impacts in this conversation with Henry E. Brady, dean of the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley, as part of the "In the Living Room" interview series. Recorded on 08/12/2014.

Over the last two decades no criminal defense lawyer in America has had a more profound impact on advancing the rights of the convicted than has Barry Scheck. In 1992, when DNA testing was still in its infancy, Scheck, along with his colleague Peter Neufeld, founded The Innocence Project, which has since figured prominently in the release of hundreds of prison inmates. Scheck also achieved lasting fame for defending O.J. Simpson when the former football star was charged with murder. Scheck spoke with California Lawyer contributing editor Martin Lasden about his extraordinary career and the controversies surrounding it.
Sign up for UCTV's monthly e-newsletter:
contact
contact info

feedback

press

watch
where to watch

videos & podcasts

live stream

retransmission

more info
about uctv

faqs

program contributors

university of california

sitemap

follow



©2012 Regents of the University of California. All right reserved. Terms and Conditions of Use.