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In his new book, Spitting in the Soup: Inside the Dirty Game of Doping in Sports, UC San Diego alumnus and sports journalist Mark Johnson traces the doping culture in professional sports, from the early days when pills meant progress, to the current day, when athletes are vilified for the use of performance-enhancing drugs. In his book, Johnson, who has covered cycling as a writer and photographer since the 1980s, explores the complex relationships that underlie elite sports culture.

How did Zionist immigrants to early 20th century Palestine conceive of their new Arab neighbors, and how did the Arab natives make sense of the Jews arriving on Palestine's shores? Drawing on his book Defining Neighbors: Religion, Race, and the Early Zionist-Arab Encounter, Jonathan Marc Gribetz argues that this fateful encounter was initially imagined very differently from the way it ultimately developed. The Late Ottoman period in Palestine was no utopia, but exploring this moment reveals that today's hardened dividing lines are far from timeless; they have a fascinating history. Recorded on 11/06/2016.

Dorothy Robyn, now an independent analyst, shares tales of her time in government overseeing energy and environmental budget issues on military bases, participating in a public/private partnership with Ivanka Trump that converted Washington's Old Post Office Pavilion into a hotel, and preventing a life-saving satellite system from being destroyed, a feat most recently recounted "Eccentric Orbits: The Iridium Story." Robyn's conversation with Henry E. Brady, Dean of the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley, is the second of three in "The Budget Series," featuring UC GSPP alumni who are fiscal policy experts in Washington. Recorded on 11/04/2016.

Messaging expert Anat Shenker-Osorio, author of "Don't Buy It: The Trouble with Talking Nonsense About the Economy," describes how to best influence public opinion. Citing her research on causes such as abortion rights and gay marriage, she argues that the most effective way to change minds is not through the traditional "anger, hope, action" model, but instead to establish shared values with political opponents and then to present the problems that threaten those values along with potential solutions. Shenker-Osorio engages in this fascinating discussion with civil rights attorney Jonathan Stein, a fellow alum of the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley. Recorded on 01/05/2017.
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