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After its first discovery in Africa in 1947, Zika seemed like a very localized infection. However, over the last couple of decades Zika has spread around the globe, and been found to cause serious developmental defects in fetuses. Zika can be transmitted by particular types of mosquitos, which are present in the San Diego region, and by sex. However, so far we haven't seen transmission of Zika in our region. A panel discusses what Zika is, why we are so concerned about Zika, what we are doing to prevent Zika in humans, and whether Zika is a likely threat to people in the San Diego region.

Richard Florida, world renowned urbanist and author of several best sellers including "The Rise of the Creative Class," offers his insights on the opportunities and challenges facing cities around the globe and how their experiences can inform' urban economic development strategies of cities as they grapples with the convergence of technology, demography and geography. Florida is in conversations with Steve Clemons of the Atlantic Magazine and Mary Walshok, UC San Diego Associate Vice Chancellor.

How did Zionist immigrants to early 20th century Palestine conceive of their new Arab neighbors, and how did the Arab natives make sense of the Jews arriving on Palestine's shores? Drawing on his book Defining Neighbors: Religion, Race, and the Early Zionist-Arab Encounter, Jonathan Marc Gribetz argues that this fateful encounter was initially imagined very differently from the way it ultimately developed. The Late Ottoman period in Palestine was no utopia, but exploring this moment reveals that today's hardened dividing lines are far from timeless; they have a fascinating history. Recorded on 11/06/2016.

Messaging expert Anat Shenker-Osorio, author of "Don't Buy It: The Trouble with Talking Nonsense About the Economy," describes how to best influence public opinion. Citing her research on causes such as abortion rights and gay marriage, she argues that the most effective way to change minds is not through the traditional "anger, hope, action" model, but instead to establish shared values with political opponents and then to present the problems that threaten those values along with potential solutions. Shenker-Osorio engages in this fascinating discussion with civil rights attorney Jonathan Stein, a fellow alum of the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley. Recorded on 01/05/2017.
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