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E. Randol Schoenberg, the grandson of the composer Arnold Schoenberg, is an expert in handling cases involving looted art and the recovery of property stolen by the Nazi authorities during the Holocaust. He tells the story here of his most prominent case, "Republic of Austria v. Altmann" which resulted in the successful return of six paintings by Gustav Klimt, including the "Golden Lady," to their rightful owners. Recorded on 05/06/2015.

From the moment Myrlie Evers-Williams faced the murder of her husband, civil rights activist Medgar Evers, she became a pivotal figure in the civil rights movement. For more than five decades, she has fought to carry on his legacy, never relenting in her determination to change the face of race relations in this country. She reflects here on the impact of the 1965 march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, and calls on today's Americans to continue her quest to quash racism and bring equality for all. This heartfelt talk was presented by Thurgood Marshall College, the Helen Edison Lecture Series and the Office of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion at UC San Diego.

A leading moral and political philosopher, Kwame Anthony Appiah is Professor of Philosophy and Law at New York University. He explores the ideas of the philosopher Hans Vahinger, who argued that our theories of the world involved understanding things "as if" what is in fact false were true. He uses Vahinger's ideas to discuss a contemporary philosophical proposal, due to Dan Dennett, that says that human beings can be understood by way of an "intentional strategy" that "consists of treating the object whose behavior you want to predict as a rational agent with beliefs and desires and other mental states ." Since, as Appiah suggests, we are not fully rational, there is a puzzle about why this should work. Recorded on 02/06/2015.

Lydia Davis reads from her latest collection of short stories, "Can't and Won't," and speaks of her writing processes when dealing with her own work and translated work.

Economist Joseph Stiglitz and former Labor Secretary Robert Reich reminisce about opposing "corporate welfare" during their days in the Clinton Administration and talk here about problematic trade deals, income inequality and Stiglitz's new book, "The Great Divide: Unequal Societies and What We Can Do About Them." Reich and Stiglitz are presented by the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley. Recorded on 04/29/2015.
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