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Renowned author and Middlebury College Professor Jay Parini charms his dinner audience with selections from his "Promised Land: Thirteen Books That Changed America." From "The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin" and "Walden," through "Uncle Tom's Cabin" to "How to Win Friends and Influence People" and "The Feminine Mystique," Parini offers a compelling narrative on the evolution of American culture. Parini was the keynote speaker at the UC San Diego Library's "Dinner in the Library," which takes place annually in Geisel Library.

Political theorist Fonna Forman and architect-urbanist Teddy Cruz explore the idea of human happiness as it manifests in patterns of urbanization, from the public architecture of the ancient polis to the modern suburban sprawl of the San Diego-Tijuana region. Cruz and Forman are co-directors of the Blum Cross-Border Initiative at UC San Diego and leaders of the new Civic Innovation Lab for the City of San Diego.

From the moment of birth, human infants require an inordinate amount of care and, unlike our nearest living relatives, remain dependent on a variety of caretakers during an unusually long maturation period followed by extraordinary adult longevity. How did such a distinctive pattern of development evolve and what other human features are linked to it? Wenda Trevathan (New Mexico State Univ) begins with a discussion about Birth and the Newborn Infant, followed by Kim Bard (Univ of Portsmouth) on the Infant State in Apes and Humans, and Sarah Blaffer Hrdy (UC Davis) on Born Human: How the Utterly Dependent Survive.

Story Hour in the Library celebrates the writers in the UC Berkeley campus community with an annual student reading. The event features short excerpts of work by winners of the year's biggest prose prizes, Story Hour in the Library interns, and faculty nominees. Recorded on 05/01/2014.

Over the last two decades no criminal defense lawyer in America has had a more profound impact on advancing the rights of the convicted than has Barry Scheck. In 1992, when DNA testing was still in its infancy, Scheck, along with his colleague Peter Neufeld, founded The Innocence Project, which has since figured prominently in the release of hundreds of prison inmates. Scheck also achieved lasting fame for defending O.J. Simpson when the former football star was charged with murder. Scheck spoke with California Lawyer contributing editor Martin Lasden about his extraordinary career and the controversies surrounding it.
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